The Crooked & Narrow Streets of the Town of Boston 1630-1822 Annie Haven Thwing

ISBN: 9781230325439

Published: September 12th 2013

Paperback

92 pages


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The Crooked & Narrow Streets of the Town of Boston 1630-1822  by  Annie Haven Thwing

The Crooked & Narrow Streets of the Town of Boston 1630-1822 by Annie Haven Thwing
September 12th 2013 | Paperback | PDF, EPUB, FB2, DjVu, AUDIO, mp3, ZIP | 92 pages | ISBN: 9781230325439 | 5.80 Mb

This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1920 edition. Excerpt: ... SECTION V THE NECK THEMoreThis historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1920 edition. Excerpt: ... SECTION V THE NECK THE last but not the least important section into which we have divided the town is that which connects the peninsula with the main land.

It takes in all that part south of Essex and Boylston Streets to the Roxbury line, just south of the present Thorndike Street, where a short stone post marks the boundary. The land begins to narrow near Essex Street, but the neck proper begins at the narrowest point, which is Dover Street.

Tremont Street, south of Boylston Street, was called Nassau Street in 1735. Between Boylston and Hollis Streets it was laid out by the Eliot and Holyoke heirs in 1740, and called Walkers Street, in 1741. In 1744 fifty pounds was paid to John Clough for the highway laid out through his land from Frog Lane to Nassau Street. In 1788 from Orange Street by Rev. Mr. Byles house to Frog lane named Nassau Street. In 1836 it was extended to the Roxbury line, and all called Tremont Street.

In 1771 a cross way formerly so called now Holyoke Street. The lot on the southwest corner of Boylston Street was that of Robert Walker according to the Book of Possessions, but he soon sold out to Jacob Eliot, and William Powell bought it in 1763. The Eliot heirs owned as far as Hollis Street on the west side. Mather Byles bought a house and land of Abigail Stacey in 1741, about on the site of the Childrens * 228 THE CROOKED STREETS OF BOSTON 229 Mission. The front part of his land was included in the widening of Tremont Street. Major John Crane, one of the Tea Party, lived opposite Hollis Street.

He left Boston when the port bill went into effect and served with distinction throughout the war, succeeding Knox as colonel of the Massachusetts regiment of artillery. He was commander of the line on the neck....



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